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The Fox and the Geese

The Grimm Brothers

The Beam Bearskin The Blue Light The Brave Little Tailor The Bremen Town Musicians Brother and Sister Brother Lustig Cinderella Clever Grethel Clever Hans The Crystal Ball The Death of the Little Hen The Devil's Sooty Brother The Devil With the Three Golden Hairs The Dog and the Sparrow The Duration of Life The Ear of Corn The Elves Eve's Various Children Faithful John The Fisherman and His Wife The Fox and the Geese The Frog-King, or Iron Henry The Girl Without Hands The Glass Coffin The Godfather The Golden Goose The Good Bargain The Grave-Mound The Griffin Hansel and Grethel Hans in Luck Hans Married The Hare and the Hedgehog The Hare's Bride The Hut in the Forest Iron John The Iron Stove The Juniper-Tree King Thrushbeard The Lazy Spinner Little Briar-Rose Little Red-Cap [Little Red Riding Hood] Little Snow-white Maid Maleen The Moon The Nail Old Hildebrand Old Rinkrank Old Sultan Our Lady's Child The Peasant and the Devil The Poor Boy in the Grave The Poor Man and the Rich Man The Queen Bee Rapunzel The Raven The Riddle The Robber Bridegroom Rumpelstiltskin The Shoes That Were Danced to Pieces The Singing Bone The Six Swans The Spindle, The Shuttle, and the Needle The Spirit in the Bottle St. Joseph in the Forest Sweetheart Roland Sweet Porridge The Thief and His Master The Three Brothers The Three Little Men in the Wood The Three Spinners Thumbling The Twelve Brothers The Twelve Huntsmen The Water of Life The White Snake The Wolf and the Man The Wonderful Musician The Young Giant

The fox once came to a meadow in which was a flock of fine fat geese, on which he smiled and said, "I come in the nick of time, you are sitting together quite beautifully, so that I can eat you up one after the other." The geese cackled with terror, sprang up, and began to wail and beg piteously for their lives. But the fox would listen to nothing, and said, "There is no mercy to be had! You must die." At length one of them took heart and said, "If we poor geese are to yield up our vigorous young lives, show us the only possible favour and allow us one more prayer, that we may not die in our sins, and then we will place ourselves in a row, so that you can always pick yourself out the fattest." "Yes," said the fox, "that is reasonable, and a pious request. Pray away, I will wait till you are done." Then the first began a good long prayer, for ever saying, "Ga! Ga!" and as she would make no end, the second did not wait until her turn came, but began also, "Ga! Ga!" The third and fourth followed her, and soon they were all cackling together.

When they have done praying, the story shall be continued further, but at present they are still praying without stopping."

The End

Fables & Tales Nonfiction Poetry Short Stories

Aesop Andersen, H.C. Dickinson, Emily Frost, Robert Grimm Henry, O Kipling, Rudyard Longfellow, Henry Poe, Edgar Allan Shakespeare, William Thoreau, Henry Twain, Mark Wilde, Oscar